What is Auto Fraud?

If you are a victem of Auto Dealer Fraud we can help

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BEFORE THE SALE:

Prior Accident History

Unrepaired Accident Damage

Prior Lemon Law Buyback

Salvage / Junk / Rebuilt Branded Titles

Theft Recovery Vehicles

Washed Title Vehicles
Poor Mechanical Condition
Repaired New Cars
Odometer Rollback / TMU
Bait and Switch Advertising
Certified Vehicles – Too Good To Be True
Motorcycle / Jetski / Boat Ads

DURING THE SALE:

Bad Credit / No CreditA

Foreign-Language Contracts

Overcharging Fees

Packing Payments

Selling a Used Car as New

Selling for Over the Advertised or Sticker Price

Trade-In Over-Allowing

Unwanted Products / Services

Motorcycle, Jetski, Boat and Watercraft Financing

AFTER THE SALE:

Cooling-Off Periods and the 10-Day Rule

AFTER THE SALE:

Cooling-Off Periods and the 10-Day Rule

Consumers Right to Return a Vehicle: 

Buying a Cooling-Off Period: The 2-Day Right to Return

Right to Return a Vehicle Due To Dealer Misconduct

Dealer’s Right to Demand Return:

0-10 Days

Over 10 Days

Illegal Repossession

Missing Smog Equipment

Failure to Provide Registration or Title

Concealed Mechanical Defects

The Lemon Law:

Express Warranties

New or Used Vehicles Can Be Lemons

Examples of Defects

What is a Repair Attempt?

Manufacturer Arbitration Programs

Implied Warranty of Merchantability

Implied Warranty of Fitness for a Particular Purpose

Failure to Pay Off Trade-In Vehicle

Q & A

BEFORE THE SALE:

Prior Accident History

Some dealers specialize in selling accident-damaged vehicles. The dealer will run a CarFax on an obviously damaged vehicle. If it is clean, they will buy it, because they know they can show consumers the clean CarFax to “prove” it has never been in an accident. CarFax Vehicle History Reports don't always show the whole story. CarFax can only report history that has been reported to it. If a vehicle is repaired at an auto repair shop that does not report to CarFax, the accident will not be shown on the CarFax. If you suspect that your vehicle has been in an accident, we will run a battery of vehicle history reports, including CarFax, Autocheck, and National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) reports.

Unrepaired Accident Damage

Many accident-damaged vehicles are poorly repaired, or only repaired cosmetically. We have inspected vehicles that seemed to be in good condition, but were missing hidden parts such as bumper bars or airbags. It is illegal to sell poorly repaired, unsafe vehicles. If you suspect that your vehicle has been in an accident, or has missing or broken parts, we can help. We will run a battery of vehicle history reports, including CarFax, Autocheck, and National Motor Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) reports and help you discover the truth.

Prior Lemon Law Buyback

When a vehicle cannot be repaired by a manufacturer or their dealer, the vehicle must be permanently labeled a “Lemon Law Buyback.” The law requires a dealer to tell all buyers that the vehicle is a "Lemon" before purchase. Dealers never do this because “Lemon” vehicles are worth far less than other vehicles, and usually have chronic mechanical issues. We do not recommend purchasing a prior “Lemon” vehicle. If you suspect your vehicle is a "Lemon," contact us. And usually have chronic mechanical issues. We do not recommend purchasing a prior “Lemon” vehicle. If you suspect your vehicle is a "Lemon," contact us.

Salvage / Junk / Rebuilt Branded Titles

A dealer must inform you that a vehicle is Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt before you purchase. A vehicle
with “Salvage,” “Junk,” or “Rebuilt” title (“Salvage certificate” in California) means an
insurance company deemed the vehicle a “total loss.” Usually, this means the vehicle was in a
serious accident, and sustained damage that would cost more to repair than the value of the
vehicle. Dealers will purchase such vehicles at a Salvage Auction, and repair them as cheaply as
possible. Usually, salvage vehicles have shoddy, cosmetic repairs, with hidden unrepaired
damage or missing parts. We have seen multiple salvage vehicles that were missing airbags and
sensors or suspension parts. One salvage vehicle had large chunks missing from its frame, hidden
by plastic trim pieces. Never buy a Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle.


Many insurance companies will refuse to insure a Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle. Many banks
will refuse to finance loans to buy a Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle.will refuse to finance loans to buy a Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle.

Theft Recovery Vehicles

Many dealers will advertise a vehicle as a “Theft Recovery.” There is no such thing as a “Theft
Recovery” title - it is a Salvage or Total Loss vehicle. A dealer must inform you that a vehicle is
Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt before you purchase. In some cases, stolen vehicles are taken to a “Chop
Shop.” Easily sellable, high-value items are stripped from the car, including airbags, stereo,
speakers, doors, lights, electrical sensors, etc. If enough parts are stolen, the cost to replace these
items is greater than the value of the vehicle, and the insurance company will deem the vehicle a
“total loss.” In other cases, a stolen vehicle will be taken for a joyride that ended with the vehicle
on fire, or in a river. Bottom Line: if the insurance company deemed the vehicle a total loss,
there is a good reason for it. Dealers make money on “Theft Recovery” vehicles by making
cheap repairs, hiding damage, or selling the vehicle with missing parts. Never buy a
Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle, even if it was a “Theft Recovery.”


Many insurance companies will refuse to insure a Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle. Many banks
will refuse to finance loans to buy a Salvage/Junk/Rebuilt vehicle.

The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal advice on any matter.

The transmission and receipt of information contained on this Website, in whole or in part, or communication with Nehoray & Drake via the Internet or e-mail through this website does not constitute or create a lawyer-client relationship between us and any recipient. You should not send us any confidential information in response to this webpage. Such responses will not create a lawyer-client relationship, and whatever you disclose to us will not be privileged or confidential unless we have agreed to act as your legal counsel and you have executed a written engagement agreement with Nehoray & Drake. The material on this website may not reflect the most current legal developments. The content and interpretation of the law addressed herein is subject to revision. We disclaim all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any or all the contents of this site to the fullest extent permitted by law. Do not act or refrain from acting upon this information without seeking professional legal counsel.